Resilient Coasts - Great Yarmouth and East Suffolk

Resilient Coasts logo. "Great Yarmouth & East Suffolk. For people. For the environment. For the economy. Forever"

What is Resilient Coasts?

TL;DR? Watch our short video for a whistle-stop tour of the Resilient Coasts project.

dotted line for spacing in layout

Resilient Coasts will create practical tools to help our coastal communities plan for their future.Map of the Great Yarmouth and East Suffolk coastal frontages, showing the pilot sites

Over the past five years there has been a rapid increase in named storms and erosion incidents. Resilient Coasts will work with communities in nine pilot locations to help them prepare for the impacts of our changing coast.

Our work alongside communities will help individuals, businesses, and community groups to be actively involved in their future. It includes:

  • continuing to help support those communities at the highest risk of erosion,
  • helping communities discuss and plan for adapting to climate and coastal change,
  • co-creating plans with communities,
  • mapping what is at risk,
  • investigating alternative technology and engineering practices,
  • understanding how the coast is changing,
  • looking at funding sources, including a seed fund for communities at risk.

The project will be completed in 2027 and is is being led by Coastal Partnership East on behalf of East Suffolk Council and Great Yarmouth Borough Council. Resilient Coasts is funded by Defra as part of the £200 million Flood and Coastal Innovation Programmes which is managed by the Environment Agency. The programmes will drive innovation in flood and coastal resilience and adaptation to a changing climate.

Aerial shot of Great Yarmouth beach


dotted line for spacing in layout

What are the challenges?

We will work with residents, businesses, industry, government organisations, and landowners to create longer-term plans that mean:

  • addressing funding gaps,
  • a joined-up approach to coastal issues with infrastructure and industries,
  • better tools to work with future generations,
  • longer-term plans that mean communities are prepared and safe,
  • new technology to provide up to date information in communicating risk,
  • new innovative engineering solutions that will work on our dynamic coast.

We will use innovation to find long-lasting resilience solutions for the whole coast. We are gathering evidence to influence policy nationally to make change locally.

dotted line for spacing in layout

Knowing what is at riskIcons depicting "mapping assets" and "mapping risk"

There is a lot we are still learning about how our coast works and how the North Sea is shaping it in the face of rapid coastal change and sea level rise. It is important to know what is at risk to understand how we can help communities to become more resilient.


To understand the impacts of the risk, we need to develop a map of all the “things” we value along our coast, including:

  • • homes and businesses,
  • • churches, religious/community buildings and other heritage and culture assets,
  • • buried infrastructure, such as pipelines and electricity cables,
  • • roads,
  • • private water supplies,
  • • septic tanks,
  • • land with community value, such as well used footpaths, community playing fields and woodland,
  • • land boundaries (e.g. gardens),
  • • schools,
  • • hospitals/ doctors’ surgeries.

  • Through the map we will identify how we might help those at risk and the options that are available. This might include identifying land for rollback, supporting planners to find alternative solutions, and beginning to speak to infrastructure providers with key assets at risk.

Aerial shot of Southwold coast showing rock groynes and eroding land to North

How do we manage our own assets?

Along with understanding what is at risk, we need to think about how we invest in our own assets. An asset is anything Coastal Partnership East is responsible for, which include navigation markers, groynes, and access ramps. We already monitor, maintain, and repair our coast, but as it continues to change we need to do this as effectively and efficiently as possible.

We are working towards a fully costed asset management plan, which means we will know how much each asset will cost to implement, maintain and decommission. The plan will help us to make decisions about whether we should continue to maintain old defences and alternative solutions should be investigated.

A digger and pipeline on a beach, carrying out sandscaping


This could include nature-based solutions, like the sandscaping scheme at Bacton and Walcott.

We are also looking at creating a rock stockpile. This would provide temporary defences that can be moved to where they are most needed as the coast changes.

In June 2023, we put out a call to action to see what alternative products are available. We have already engaged with engineering companies, and others, to gather information on new and innovative approaches and materials.

Coastal challenges - a community voice

The video below discusses some of the challenges faced by our coastal communities. Lucy Ansbro, a resident of Thorpeness, talks about how she has been affected.



How to get involved

If you are a designer, engineer, entrepreneur, or just have a great idea for innovative ways to inform our coastal adaptation plans, please let us know using the "Coastal Adaptation, Innovation and Resilience" contact form below.


How our project is testing innovation:

We are testing 5 resilience actions as part of the Flood and Coastal Resilience Innovation Programme:

  • Nature based solutions
  • Community infrastructure resilience
  • Monitoring and management of local assets
  • Minimise damages and disruption to small and medium sized businesses
  • Community and voluntary sector action to be better prepared and recover more quickly

Who are we?

Logos of East Suffolk Council, Great Yarmouth Borough Council and Coastal Partnership East

East Suffolk Council (ESC), is the lead authority for this project, working with delivery partners Great Yarmouth Borough Council (GYBC) and Coastal Partnership East.

Coastal Partnership East is an innovative approach to managing the coast between Holkham in North Norfolk and Landguard Point in Felixstowe, bringing together the coastal management resources and expertise from Great Yarmouth Borough Council, North Norfolk District Council, and East Suffolk Council. Coastal Partnership East works in partnership with the Environment Agency, the Water Management Alliance, coast and estuary community partnerships and others along the 173km of coast in Norfolk and Suffolk.

We are also working with Babergh District Council, with Shotley as one of the locations in the pilot.

Who is working with us

AECOM, Anglian Water, Babergh District Council, Balfour Beatty, Broadland Futures Initiative, Coastal Partners Solent, Corton Parish Council, Grantham Research Institute, GroundWork, Hemsby Parish Council, Icarus, Local Government Association Coastal Special Interest Group (LGA SIG), London School of Economics, Marsh, Norfolk Coast Forum, Pakefield Community Steering Group, Save Hemsby Coastline Community Group, Shotley Parish Council, Southwold to Walberswick Board, Suffolk Coast Forum, The Crown Estate, Thorpeness Coastal Futures, Tyndall Centre/University of East Anglia, Zurich Flood Resilience Alliance

What is Resilient Coasts?

TL;DR? Watch our short video for a whistle-stop tour of the Resilient Coasts project.

dotted line for spacing in layout

Resilient Coasts will create practical tools to help our coastal communities plan for their future.Map of the Great Yarmouth and East Suffolk coastal frontages, showing the pilot sites

Over the past five years there has been a rapid increase in named storms and erosion incidents. Resilient Coasts will work with communities in nine pilot locations to help them prepare for the impacts of our changing coast.

Our work alongside communities will help individuals, businesses, and community groups to be actively involved in their future. It includes:

  • continuing to help support those communities at the highest risk of erosion,
  • helping communities discuss and plan for adapting to climate and coastal change,
  • co-creating plans with communities,
  • mapping what is at risk,
  • investigating alternative technology and engineering practices,
  • understanding how the coast is changing,
  • looking at funding sources, including a seed fund for communities at risk.

The project will be completed in 2027 and is is being led by Coastal Partnership East on behalf of East Suffolk Council and Great Yarmouth Borough Council. Resilient Coasts is funded by Defra as part of the £200 million Flood and Coastal Innovation Programmes which is managed by the Environment Agency. The programmes will drive innovation in flood and coastal resilience and adaptation to a changing climate.

Aerial shot of Great Yarmouth beach


dotted line for spacing in layout

What are the challenges?

We will work with residents, businesses, industry, government organisations, and landowners to create longer-term plans that mean:

  • addressing funding gaps,
  • a joined-up approach to coastal issues with infrastructure and industries,
  • better tools to work with future generations,
  • longer-term plans that mean communities are prepared and safe,
  • new technology to provide up to date information in communicating risk,
  • new innovative engineering solutions that will work on our dynamic coast.

We will use innovation to find long-lasting resilience solutions for the whole coast. We are gathering evidence to influence policy nationally to make change locally.

dotted line for spacing in layout

Knowing what is at riskIcons depicting "mapping assets" and "mapping risk"

There is a lot we are still learning about how our coast works and how the North Sea is shaping it in the face of rapid coastal change and sea level rise. It is important to know what is at risk to understand how we can help communities to become more resilient.


To understand the impacts of the risk, we need to develop a map of all the “things” we value along our coast, including:

  • • homes and businesses,
  • • churches, religious/community buildings and other heritage and culture assets,
  • • buried infrastructure, such as pipelines and electricity cables,
  • • roads,
  • • private water supplies,
  • • septic tanks,
  • • land with community value, such as well used footpaths, community playing fields and woodland,
  • • land boundaries (e.g. gardens),
  • • schools,
  • • hospitals/ doctors’ surgeries.

  • Through the map we will identify how we might help those at risk and the options that are available. This might include identifying land for rollback, supporting planners to find alternative solutions, and beginning to speak to infrastructure providers with key assets at risk.

Aerial shot of Southwold coast showing rock groynes and eroding land to North

How do we manage our own assets?

Along with understanding what is at risk, we need to think about how we invest in our own assets. An asset is anything Coastal Partnership East is responsible for, which include navigation markers, groynes, and access ramps. We already monitor, maintain, and repair our coast, but as it continues to change we need to do this as effectively and efficiently as possible.

We are working towards a fully costed asset management plan, which means we will know how much each asset will cost to implement, maintain and decommission. The plan will help us to make decisions about whether we should continue to maintain old defences and alternative solutions should be investigated.

A digger and pipeline on a beach, carrying out sandscaping


This could include nature-based solutions, like the sandscaping scheme at Bacton and Walcott.

We are also looking at creating a rock stockpile. This would provide temporary defences that can be moved to where they are most needed as the coast changes.

In June 2023, we put out a call to action to see what alternative products are available. We have already engaged with engineering companies, and others, to gather information on new and innovative approaches and materials.

Coastal challenges - a community voice

The video below discusses some of the challenges faced by our coastal communities. Lucy Ansbro, a resident of Thorpeness, talks about how she has been affected.



How to get involved

If you are a designer, engineer, entrepreneur, or just have a great idea for innovative ways to inform our coastal adaptation plans, please let us know using the "Coastal Adaptation, Innovation and Resilience" contact form below.


How our project is testing innovation:

We are testing 5 resilience actions as part of the Flood and Coastal Resilience Innovation Programme:

  • Nature based solutions
  • Community infrastructure resilience
  • Monitoring and management of local assets
  • Minimise damages and disruption to small and medium sized businesses
  • Community and voluntary sector action to be better prepared and recover more quickly

Who are we?

Logos of East Suffolk Council, Great Yarmouth Borough Council and Coastal Partnership East

East Suffolk Council (ESC), is the lead authority for this project, working with delivery partners Great Yarmouth Borough Council (GYBC) and Coastal Partnership East.

Coastal Partnership East is an innovative approach to managing the coast between Holkham in North Norfolk and Landguard Point in Felixstowe, bringing together the coastal management resources and expertise from Great Yarmouth Borough Council, North Norfolk District Council, and East Suffolk Council. Coastal Partnership East works in partnership with the Environment Agency, the Water Management Alliance, coast and estuary community partnerships and others along the 173km of coast in Norfolk and Suffolk.

We are also working with Babergh District Council, with Shotley as one of the locations in the pilot.

Who is working with us

AECOM, Anglian Water, Babergh District Council, Balfour Beatty, Broadland Futures Initiative, Coastal Partners Solent, Corton Parish Council, Grantham Research Institute, GroundWork, Hemsby Parish Council, Icarus, Local Government Association Coastal Special Interest Group (LGA SIG), London School of Economics, Marsh, Norfolk Coast Forum, Pakefield Community Steering Group, Save Hemsby Coastline Community Group, Shotley Parish Council, Southwold to Walberswick Board, Suffolk Coast Forum, The Crown Estate, Thorpeness Coastal Futures, Tyndall Centre/University of East Anglia, Zurich Flood Resilience Alliance

  • We're looking for your innovative ideas and solutions on issues like:

    • Tracking the movement of cliffs and/ or sediment
    • Alternative monitoring techniques including beach levels and volumes, sand bank and ness movement, cliff regression etc, - for example, radar, satellite
    • Hard defence to soft cliff transition options
    • Emergency response options – alternatives to rock
    • Emergency response options - procurement routes
    • Decommissioning/ reuse of assets including timber structures
    • New/ sustainable materials

     The sort of information we'd like from you to explain your idea (not all of this will be relevant for all ideas, and there may be other information, not listed below that you want to supply)

    • Case studies or information on where the approach has been trialled
    • Web links
    • Lessons learnt / any challenges
    • Design life
    • Carbon footprint
    • Place of manufacture
    • Usage restrictions 
    • Whether the product is commercially available
    • Cost indication
    • Biodiversity
    • Availability / lead in times
    Complete Form
Page last updated: 11 Jul 2024, 03:57 PM